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Manager: Lactic Acidosis, Not Cardio To Blame For Carwin’s Body Seizing Up In Lesnar Fight (Update)

“We don’t want it to come off sounding like an excuse. Shane had the 100-percent best camp he’s ever had coming into a fight and it shouldn’t diminish Brock’s victory in any way… But what happened, what caused the shutdown, was lactic acidosis. It just comes from exploding like he was doing, not properly breathing, and not having your body prepared for it… Even though he said he was going out to land a strike, it was over in the corner. Normally in the corner is when your body begins to recover and that wasn’t happening. His body was getting worse… You can solve that issue with special diet, you can change it with training techniques, and you can train it with supplements. We’ve already got a guy that’s gonna be working with Shane to develop some things to help make some training adjustments… It’s not an excuse, as far as Shane is concerned, it’s just another way that you can lose a fight. Shane’s just happy that now he knows and can do something to work on it.”

—Shane Carwin’s manager explaining to MMA Weekly why Carwin’s body failed him after nearly finishing Brock Lesnar

Imagine staring across from Brock Lesnar knowing you’re basically defenseless because your muscles aren’t responding to what your brain is telling them. That must have been an awful feeling. Lucky for Shane, Brock decided to try out a submission instead of dropping giant hammerfists on his skull. That could have been ugly.

Despite how it played out, Carwin says he doesn’t have any regrets. He’s the type of fighter who goes in for the kill when he smells blood, and that’s what he did.

“That’s me, it’s instinctually who I am,” Carwin told MMA Fighting. “I get somebody wounded and I go in for the kill. That’s how I fight. I don’t know if there’s anything that changes that. I don’t know if I want to change that. I think it’s an exciting style, and it’s who I am as a person. I don’t have any regrets with what happened, but I do have things to work on and figure out. Now it’s time to move forward.”

He doesn’t blame Josh Rosenthal for not calling the fight either, though he knows just how close it came to being stopped.

“I put all my eggs into that basket of finishing Brock,” he said. “Josh was on top of it, he told him to improve a couple times. When you hear that and you’re the top guy, it makes you want to speed things up and finish the guy that much quicker.

“The first time Josh was getting ready to call it, I thought I was real close, but after that I didn’t reach that point with him again,” he continued. “As a ref, I thought he did a great job. How could I have any qualms since Brock was able to come back and beat me? It would have been a different story if Brock would have taken a bunch more unnecessary punishment and got messed up from it.”

Moving forward, Carwin plans to work on the things he learned from the loss, and hopes one day him and Brock “get to do it again.”

Image via Esther Lin for MMA Fighting

Update: More from Shane Carwin via

“During the first round, (referee) Josh (Rosenthal) was telling Brock to fight back or he will stop the fight,” explained Carwin, going back over the action from Saturday’s event in Las Vegas. “Every time I heard that, I unloaded a little more and eventually just punched myself out.” While many questioned Carwin’s conditioning following the first round, the Grudge Training Center staple says his cardio was not the problem.

“Anyone who questions my cardio should come and train with me. We trained for a twenty-five minute fight but things go wrong. It happens. I basically had an adrenaline dump towards the end of the first (round) and I was unable to recover in between rounds.

“I think the biggest factor of the adrenaline dump was hearing Rosenthal say, `Brock I am going to stop it,’ and then not stopping it,” admitted Carwin. “He said it at least three different points in the round, and each time I went for the finish and it never came. It sucked the wind and life out of me.”

“If I had it to do all over again I would probably go for it again. If some of those hard blows landed he would have been knocked out. This was the biggest fight of my life and I swung for the fences and came up short. Next time, I won’t falter and I will have my hand raised.”

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