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Minor Details Emerge In Steroid Conspiracy Case, Shane Carwin Remains Silent

The Shane Carwin steroid story has hardly advanced since news of the conspiracy involving Carwin and 21 other professional athletes broke last weekend. Carwin’s manager, Jason Genet, informed multiple outlets that a formal statement would be made a later date. That later date has yet to come though since Carwin’s lips are still sealed on the matter. He acknowledged the situation on his Twitter account, but claimed he was told not to comment for now.

I am fighting that fight currently. Being told I cant I however feel like I should.

It’s unknown if he’s not talking due to legal implications stemming from the court case or if it’s merely a PR strategy. Either way, that didn’t stop him from responding to comments Roy Nelson made about the situation when the story broke.

Nelson: “Just woke up and was reading the mma news websites and only one had real news ufc champ shane carwin steroids court case… I am surprised that athletes in mma do steroids ;( that explains body types”

Carwin: “I love Roy Nelson trying to elevate his status by talking smacks. Hopefully he is doing so on a treadmil. Some have rolls he has a bakery… what surgey? Roy getting the lap band? “

Nelson chose to respond by retweeting some of his fans’ opinions on the matter.

RT @katchphraze: @roynelsonmma is bang on. Before carwin comments on roy nelson he should make a formal statement.

RT @axemaster: How can @shanecarwin even begin 2 talk shit bout @roynelsonmma while hes in the middle of a steriod scandal? Roy may eat but he don’t cheat.

The Twitter feud stopped there, but of course, the questions do not. As you may remember, “S.C.,” who is believed to be Shane Carwin but not 100% confirmed, was connected to Brett Branch and Dr. Kelly Tucker of Infinite Health in one of the court documents. The Fight Lawyer dug a little deeper and discovered more court documents that details every order “S.C.” placed, including the dates, order items and cost.

18.  S.C. – On or about January 18, 2006, Branch completed a prescription form and recommended to TUCKER that S.C., a 31 year old male, should receive Testosterone Blend (ICED), Trenbolone Acetate, Stanozolol, HGH, and Anastrozole, with three refills. TUCKER signed the prescription and faxed it to APS. J. Mallory Mallon filled the order, which included three vials of Testosterone Blend (ICED), three vials of Trenbolone Acetate, three vials of Stanozolol, and 30 capsules of Anastrozole. S.C. paid $530.45 for the drugs. The HGH was filled at a later time.

On or about April 7, 2006, Branch completed another prescription form and recommended to TUCKER that S.C. should receive Testosterone Blend (ICED), Nandrolone Decanoate, Stanozolol, and Anastrozole, with six refills. TUCKER authorized the prescription which was faxed to APS. On or about April 12, 2006, J. Mallory Mallon filled the order, except for the Testosterone Blend (ICED). The drugs cost $207.50.

On or about May 1, 2006, S.C. requested and received refills of Testosterone Blend (ICED), Nandrolone Decanoate, Stanozolol, and Anastrozole from APS. The refill order was filled by J. Mallory Mallon. S.C. was charged $235.75. The next day, on or about May 2, 2006, S.C. requested and received another vial of Stanozolol. J. Mallory Mallon filled the order and S.C. paid $26.75 for the drug.

On or about May 11, 2006, Branch filled out a prescription form recommending that TUCKER prescribe HCG, with one refill, for S.C. TUCKER approved the prescription and faxed it to APS. The prescription was placed ‘on hold.’

On or about June 5, 2006, Branch prepared a prescription form recommending that TUCKER prescribe HCG and Vitamin B 12, with three refills, for S.C. TUCKER signed the prescription form and faxed it to APS. The prescription was placed ‘on hold.’ Two days later, on or about June 7, 2006, S.C. requested and received the following drugs, which were either initial fills or refills: Testosterone Blend (ICED), Nandrolone Decanoate, two vials of Stanozolol, Anastrozole, HCG, and Vitamin B12 injections. J. Mallory Mallon filled the order, which cost $301.50.

On or about June 13, 2006, S.C. received three vials of the HGH that had been placed ‘on hold.’ S.C. paid $442.64 for the HGH.

On or about July 31, 2006, S.C. requested and received refills of the Testosterone Blend (ICED), Nandrolone Decanoate, two vials of Stanozolol, Anastrozole, HCG, and Vitamin B 12.  J. Mallory Mallon filled the order, and S.C. paid $301.50 for the drugs.

On August 4, 2006, Branch completed a prescription form and recommended to TUCKER that S.C. receive Anastrozole. TUCKER authorized the prescription, which was faxed to APS.

On or about August 21, 2006, S.C. requested and received refills of the Testosterone Blend (ICED), Nandrolone Decanoate, two vials of Stanozolol, Anastrozole, and Vitamin B12.  J. Michael Bennett filled the order and S.C. was charged $294.50 for the drugs.

The Fight Lawler also discovered information in the court documents regarding the Infinite Health operation and how it was run by Branch and Dr. Tucker. If you read my update in the initial post on the scandal, this may be a little redundant.

Typically, Infinite Health customers would consult with Branch, paying a fee of $395.00, which included the cost of blood tests. Next, Branch, who is not a physician, would determine what combination or “stack” of anabolic steroids – including Trenbolone, a bovine/equine steroid not approved for human use – and other drugs, including HGH, were appropriate for the customer. Generally, Branch would fill out a prescription – a preprinted form on which Branch checked off drugs and specified dosages – and fax it or hand deliver it, or cause it to be faxed or delivered, to TUCKER, Dr. Olds, or Dr. Corliss, along with the customer’s blood test results. Branch’s customer would then see the physician, who would sign the prescription/order that Branch prepared. Next, the physician would fax the order, or cause it to be faxed, to Applied Pharmacy in Mobile. For each customer who obtained a prescription, Branch paid the physician $100. APS, in tum, would fill the order and ship the drugs via Federal Express, sometimes to the customer’s address and sometimes to Branch. The customers paid for the drugs personally since Applied Pharmacy generally did not do business with insurance companies.

Branch approached TUCKER in April or May of 2005 and asked if he would be interested in working as a physician with Infinite Health.  TUCKER agreed to see Branch’s customers. From May to September, 2005, Branch saw Infinite Health customers and authorized prescriptions formulated by Branch, as generally described above, for $100 per customer.  In September 2005, TUCKER, Branch and Winter went to dinner, where they formalized an agreement for TUCKER and Winter to invest in Infinite Health. On September 29, 2005, TUCKER purchased five shares of Infinite Health stock – which equaled 50% of Infinite Health’s business – for $60,000. Thereafter, TUCKER continued to see Infinite Health customers without the $100 fee, although Branch promised TUCKER that he would soon begin to receive 5% of Infinite Health’s earnings. In actuality, Branch never distributed any earnings to TUCKER. Nevertheless, as late as August, 2006, Branch and TUCKER discussed expanding Infinite Health’s customer base and recruiting new doctors.  Winter also invested in Infinite Health. As Branch’s partner, Winter would sometimes drop off paperwork for the customers who were scheduled to meet with TUCKER. Winter and Branch always dealt directly with TUCKER; he did not interact with the staff at TUCKER’S clinic.

If you’re still having trouble understanding what went down and where Shane Carwin fits into all of this, I suggest you check out S.C. Michaelson’s excellent breakdown of the entire story over at WKR.

Image via Sherdog

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